CVS (chorionic villus sampling)

A week ago I didn’t know what CVS was.

In a nutshell and from the perspective of a non-medical professional, it is a diagnostic  technique where a sample is collected from the placenta and used to test (at around 99% accuracy) for issues such as chromosomal abnormalities in a developing foetus.

I talked to BEP about my options following a high nuchal translucency reading. He recommended CVS, as the results are available in 48 hours. This was in comparison to our other option, a blood test, where the results would be available in around two weeks. The main downside of a CVS was a 1% risk of miscarriage. We decided that the risk was worth it for peace of mind. He also advised me that, even if the CVS came back clear we were far from being out of the woods. Apparently a high nuchal translucency reading is also related to other significant issues, like heart defects which could be fatal.

It was hard to take. I couldn’t face work on the Monday. My appointment was scheduled for 3.30pm that afternoon at the hospital. It was a similar feeling to sitting the most difficult exam of your life. I paced around the house, achieving absolutely nothing. My husband arrived home just before 3pm and together with our son we headed off.

I was crying by the time we reached the Fetal Monitoring Unit. The receptionist kept staring at me. I stared back. We were promptly called into a private room. I recognised the obstetrician there who would perform the procedure. He can be effectively summed up as Guy Smiley. Not really what you want on one of the more stressful days of your life. Guy Smiley advised us that my blood test results had come back. They weren’t good. Our risk was now one in ten. Guy Smiley irked my husband by repeatedly joking about, “sticking a needle in my belly” and nearly had his lights punched out by me when he said, “I had a one in two that was OK, you’ll be just fine!”

I had to stop crying when the CVS was performed. Guy Smiley placed some antiseptic on my tummy, and then a sterile sheet. He then used a needle to apply a local anaesthetic and then used another needle to gain the sample of placenta. I watched motionless on the ultrasound as he hacked away at the placenta. The midwife tried to talk to me about my son as though we were having a coffee together in a cafe. I didn’t respond.

It didn’t take long. Guy Smiley said I would know the result within 48 hours. The midwife said it might be slightly longer, as it was already 4pm. I recommenced my crying and toddled out to the waiting room with a fairly sensitive tummy. The receptionist stared at me again. And so began the excruciating wait for our results.

 

 

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