CVS (chorionic villus sampling)

A week ago I didn’t know what CVS was.

In a nutshell and from the perspective of a non-medical professional, it is a diagnostic  technique where a sample is collected from the placenta and used to test (at around 99% accuracy) for issues such as chromosomal abnormalities in a developing foetus.

I talked to BEP about my options following a high nuchal translucency reading. He recommended CVS, as the results are available in 48 hours. This was in comparison to our other option, a blood test, where the results would be available in around two weeks. The main downside of a CVS was a 1% risk of miscarriage. We decided that the risk was worth it for peace of mind. He also advised me that, even if the CVS came back clear we were far from being out of the woods. Apparently a high nuchal translucency reading is also related to other significant issues, like heart defects which could be fatal.

It was hard to take. I couldn’t face work on the Monday. My appointment was scheduled for 3.30pm that afternoon at the hospital. It was a similar feeling to sitting the most difficult exam of your life. I paced around the house, achieving absolutely nothing. My husband arrived home just before 3pm and together with our son we headed off.

I was crying by the time we reached the Fetal Monitoring Unit. The receptionist kept staring at me. I stared back. We were promptly called into a private room. I recognised the obstetrician there who would perform the procedure. He can be effectively summed up as Guy Smiley. Not really what you want on one of the more stressful days of your life. Guy Smiley advised us that my blood test results had come back. They weren’t good. Our risk was now one in ten. Guy Smiley irked my husband by repeatedly joking about, “sticking a needle in my belly” and nearly had his lights punched out by me when he said, “I had a one in two that was OK, you’ll be just fine!”

I had to stop crying when the CVS was performed. Guy Smiley placed some antiseptic on my tummy, and then a sterile sheet. He then used a needle to apply a local anaesthetic and then used another needle to gain the sample of placenta. I watched motionless on the ultrasound as he hacked away at the placenta. The midwife tried to talk to me about my son as though we were having a coffee together in a cafe. I didn’t respond.

It didn’t take long. Guy Smiley said I would know the result within 48 hours. The midwife said it might be slightly longer, as it was already 4pm. I recommenced my crying and toddled out to the waiting room with a fairly sensitive tummy. The receptionist stared at me again. And so began the excruciating wait for our results.

 

 

Advertisements

The world couldn’t be so cruel

It has been some time since my last post, three months or so in fact. About the time that it takes to fall pregnant and endure the first trimester of fatigue, morning sickness, hope and anxiety. And that’s no coincidence, because we’re pregnant.

It was only about a week after we were told by our obstetrician to “go forth and multiply” (his words not mine) that we conceived. Apart from the obvious, I barely know how it happened. I was still finding it difficult to decipher between withdrawal bleeding, a period and losing the last of the “products of conception” from our previous miscarriage to have any inkling about when I might be able to conceive again. But it happened. I was shocked, surprised, happy and nervous, but mainly glad that we didn’t have to endure months of anticipation. I wanted our son to have a little brother or sister before he was three.

I spent weeks going to bed early with tiredness and feeling nauseated morning, noon and night. My boobs hurt like crazy. My husband took our son to the pool, the beach, or the park almost every afternoon he could so that I could lie in bed, watching beautiful Autumn afternoons come and go through the window, but hopeful that it would soon all be worthwhile. The few friends I told I was pregnant crossed their toes and fingers for me. They asked if I was worried, “of course” I said, “but the world couldn’t be so cruel as to make this pregnancy third time unlucky.” They agreed. The world couldn’t be so cruel.

Our eight week scan went well. I was so nervous before hand that I paced around the sonographer’s office, checking over my shoulder every thirty seconds to check whether our appointment was ready. The sonographer confirmed a heartbeat probably within record time. It would have been obvious to anyone that I was a somewhat psychotic and deranged pregnant lady about to have a full blown meltdown. I proved her right somewhat by bawling uncontrollably at the sight of the heartbeat. Everything was going to be ok.

I then had a follow up appointment at BEP’s (my obstetrician) at around eleven weeks. I felt more confident than previously. I still felt sick, unlike my last pregnancy where my morning sickness had ended abruptly at around eight weeks. BEP said, “well let’s try and put your mind at ease”, and asked me to lie down so that he could perform an ultrasound. Before I could even ask whether he could see a heartbeat the baby moved! It was an incredible and unexpected moment. BEP even thought the baby measured at around twelve weeks. That magical twelve weeks.

BEP suggested that I undertake the standard twelve week nuchal translucency scan soon together with the blood test to test for issues including Down Syndrome. So I booked in at the sonographer’s that Thursday. I was slightly nervous, but nothing like the eight week scan. I’d seen the baby alive that Monday, and that had put me at ease.

The scan started well enough. The baby’s heartbeat could be seen, and the nasal bone, which apparently was a good sign. Then disaster. The sonographer began measuring the nuchal fluid. She loitered. I asked her if it was normal and she said no. The fluid measured at 3.8mm. Anything greater than 3.5mm was immediately referred to the Fetal Unit at the hospital. We asked what it meant. The sonographer said it meant it was likely that our baby had Down Syndrome. My husband asked, “what does that mean, does it mean more likely than not?” She seemed to agree. He asked again, “so is the risk, say, one in two?” She said, “it could be” and offered to enter the details into her computer to calculate our risk. One in thirteen. Lucky thirteen. Better than one in two, but one in thirteen! I’d only just turned 33 a few weeks earlier surely my risk wasn’t that high?

It was a day that, despite everything we’d been through, I hadn’t expected and it hit me hard. I cried. The midwife student shifted uncomfortably in her chair. The sonographer looked awkward and busied herself with preparing our report. “Why does this shit always happen to me?” I asked, “I don’t deserve this!” My beautiful son saw I was upset and gave me cuddles. My husband clutched my hand tightly.

We were moved into the staff room.  I cried there. Eventually we moved out to reception. I cried there too. I didn’t care that I was crying. They said I didn’t have to pay the $180 fee. I knew that must mean things were bad. And they were.